Meet the Bloggers || #XJBloggerWeek

As the creative director of a high-end ethical brand, I am forever trying to establish a balance between providing a premium quality product, whilst also appreciating those who can't necessarily afford a premium quality price - by offering Digital Pattern Library downloads, Fashion Fix's and informative snippets to encourage everyone to reconnect to their clothes.

Today, I bring you invaluable advice from a selection of inspiring women I have discovered online. If you have been involved with our Twitter campaign this week, you may have been blessed with a continuous feed of energising bloggers paving the way for the future of the conscious consumer.

 
 
Lizz - @cellvrdoor "Committed to saving animals, fighting climate change and being an all round good soul."

Lizz - @cellvrdoor

"Committed to saving animals,
fighting climate change and being an
all round good soul."

 
 
Tolmeia - @TollyDollyPosh "I'm a 16 year old ethical fashion blogger, and aspiring fashion designer. I like to scrapbook and wander around taking inspiration from all around me. Attempting to become more ethical and sustainable every day!" 

Tolmeia - @TollyDollyPosh

"I'm a 16 year old ethical fashion blogger, and aspiring fashion designer. I like to scrapbook and wander around taking inspiration from all around me. Attempting to become more ethical and sustainable every day!" 

 
 
Besma - @BesmaCC "Ethical lifestyle blogger. Finding the best in healthy food, natural beauty, ethical fashion, and the people behind them.

Besma - @BesmaCC

"Ethical lifestyle blogger. Finding the best in healthy food, natural beauty, ethical fashion, and the people behind them.

 
 
Nadine - @justdeenie "Journalism student blogging about cruelty-free beauty, vegan food, travel & trying to live more consciously. Sometimes make vids."

Nadine - @justdeenie

"Journalism student blogging about cruelty-free beauty, vegan food, travel & trying to live more consciously. Sometimes make vids."

 
 
April - @astoryfortmrw "Blogs about living consciously, cruelty-free beauty & eco fashion. Studies International Communication. Likes coffee, books & pretty stationery."

April - @astoryfortmrw

"Blogs about living consciously, cruelty-free beauty & eco fashion. Studies International Communication. Likes coffee, books & pretty stationery."

 
 
Eleanor - @eleanorclaudie "I'm interested in fashion, art, culture and cruelty free beauty; I also try not to word vomit too much.

Eleanor - @eleanorclaudie

"I'm interested in fashion, art, culture and cruelty free beauty; I also try not to word vomit too much.

 
 
Beatrice - @thefairedit "I created The Fair Edit from a mutual love of lifestyle, and of life. Combining my devotion to ethical and sustainable practices with fashion and style.

Beatrice - @thefairedit

"I created The Fair Edit from a mutual love of lifestyle, and of life. Combining my devotion to ethical and sustainable practices with fashion and style.

 
 
India Hannah Pixie - @india_pixie "Just a lil blogger, photographer, thrifter, creative, annoying ass vegan" 

India Hannah Pixie - @india_pixie

"Just a lil blogger, photographer, thrifter, creative, annoying ass vegan" 


B e s t   t i p s   t o   c o n v e r t i n g   t o   s u s t a i n a b l e   l i v i n g ?

cellvrdoor

Converting to sustainable living can be daunting for some, start small and work your way up. Cut out wasteful habits, buy a reusable water bottle, swap to steel straws and remember to bring cutlery and Tupperware with you when you go out. Once you've mastered the small steps, build up to changing energy suppliers and banks, if you own your own home you can look into installing solar panels.

TollyDollyPosh

Educate yourself! Once you started to understand things a little more clearly, your eyes will be open and everything will hopefully fall into place as to why things need to change. Read books! Read blogs! Talk and ask questions.

Besmacc

Try changing gradually - and if something doesn’t work, that’s okay. I wish I was zero waste, but it’s too much of a commitment. That’s not to say I’m wasteful - just reduced! I actually wrote a five tip guide !

justdeenie

Do lots of research – my favourite way of doing this is reading ethical blogs. Take it one step at a time and remember that nobody is perfect, we just have to do the best we can!

astoryfortmrw

Living sustainably starts by educating yourself, and realising that your behaviour and voice can enable change. Start converting to sustainable living step by step. You can, for example, start by eating less meat, buying less, and keep evolving from there.

eleanorclaudie

Be open to new ideas and concepts. It may not be the easiest thing to start with but talk to people that live more sustainably, do your research. As a student I still live at home so I don't have full control of the products I use but I do try and influence my parents decisions when buying new things and how sustainable they are. Even a little thing like using a plastic lunchbox over buying a pre packaged sandwich is better than nothing, little steps lead to big things.

thefairedit

Think before you shop... Not only ask the good old question “do I really need this?” but also “where does this product come from and how was it made?”. When you have that *click* in your brain and decide to live more sustainably, you naturally start asking questions and distinguishing what is sustainable and ethical from what isn’t, which helps you buy more consciously. 


H o w   t o   h a v e   a   l e s s   w a s t e f u l   d a y ?

cellvrdoor

Planning ahead is the best advice I can give on this, remember to pack your reusable coffee cup, water bottle, mason jar, straws, cutlery and Tupperware. You can also bring your own napkins. Make sure you eat before you leave the house or take your own food out with you to avoid buying anything pre-packaged.

TollyDollyPosh

Think about what you're disposing and where it's going. This is especially important with our clothes. It might seem like donating to a charity shop is the best option but upon research, you will find that some charity shops only sell 10% of their donations in store; the rest often gets sold on which creates a whole other issue elsewhere.

besmacc

Be prepared - it’s key! Also, eating healthy foods often reduces waste - banana skins are compostable, brunch bar wrappers are not!

justdeenie

Spend your evenings preparing for the next day. I try to keep tote bags inside any handbags or wedge some inside coat pockets so I’ll never be caught out. If you can, invest in re-usable versions of daily items: reusable makeup wipes, a water bottle and a coffee cup can make a huge difference!


T i p s   o n   e t h i c a l   f a s h i o n   o n   a   b u d g e t ?

cellvrdoor

Personally I tackle ethical shopping by mainly shopping second hand and keeping an eye out for any natural materials. When looking in charity shops and thrift stores make sure to look in every section and every size. Most of my favourite t-shirts are sizes I'd never look at in other stores. Another tip is to buy good quality, when it comes to bags and coats etc. I recommend spending a little more and buying a good quality item new so it doesn't need replacing as often. 

tollydollyposh

If you have to; shop second-hand. It's a really great alternative. It's not the answer to changing the industry because of course, that's our aim; we want to change how things are run, not get rid of it completely. Second-hand shopping has a stigma for being tricky to get right and also for being associated with your grandma's wardrobe. That's all a myth! I understand that not everyone can find what they need second-hand but if you really want to commit to ethical/sustainable fashion on a budget, it's a great route to go down. Also; shop in the sales! Ethical fashion brands have sales too which means you can save money but still buy new and support those who are doing it right.

justdeenie

I’ve always been on a tight budget, and have second-hand shopped out of necessity way before I knew about the ethics/un-sustainability of fast fashion. Charity shopping and vintage shopping are my main sources, but sometimes saving up and investing in a high-quality ethical piece is really worth it in the long run.

astoryfortmrw

If you’re on a budget and want to shop ethically I suggest you shop second hand or vintage. I also suggest to just buy less, invest in quality pieces and to take care of your clothes so they’ll last longer.

eleanorclaudie

Depop and charity shops will be your new best friend. Either that or saving to buy a piece that will last a lot longer in your wardrobe. Recently I purchased an Everlane top and jumper when they briefly shipped to the UK and I know that the clothes I bought will last an incredibly long time in my wardrobe, they may be expensive but they'll last a lot longer than if I were to go out and buy a jumper on the high street for half the price.

thefairedit

Go second hand! That’s not only cheap but great for the environment. By wearing second hand clothes and accessories, you extend the lifespan of pieces that would otherwise end up on the landfill. Consider having a capsule wardrobe. Remember that when you have a smart and high quality wardrobe, your clothes will last a lot longer and on the long run you end up saving a lot of money.

india_pixie

My biggest tip - shop second hand. 90% of my wardrobe is made up of second hand pieces from Depop, Ebay, vintage kilo sales, charity shops, vintage shops etc. 


W h a t   i s   y o u r   f a v o u r i t e   p l a c e   t o   s h o p   e t h i c a l l y ? 
y o u r b e s t   e t h i c a l   f a s h i o n   f i n d ?

cellvrdoor

My favourite places to shop ethically are second hand stores, but when it comes to buying new there a so many amazing ethical brands out there. My best ethical fashion find, probably the dungarees in my recent haulternative, I had been looking for a pair like them for years!

tollydollyposh

I always recommend People Tree. Although I have a whole host of brands in my ethical directory, I love everything they do. Their brand is built on ethics and sustainability and it's so inspiring to see. 

Besmacc

eBay by a mile. I’ve picked up a second-hand Kurt Geiger clutch for under £10, bought a £120 Whistles dress for £20… both are firm favourites even 12 months on.

justdeenie

Albany Road in Cardiff is a haven for charity shopping, but I have a lot of love for the vintage shops in the arcades too – Sobey’s and Hobos as well as the Ty Hafan boutique. My favourite find is my second-hand Levi’s jacket – it was under £10 and will last a lifetime!

astoryfortmrw

I usually shop online, but I really enjoy shopping at a local store called Koko Toko in Groningen, the Netherlands. My best ethical fashion find is a simple, black dress from Armedangels. I always get compliments when I wear it, and it super comfortable as well.

eleanorclaudie

Ooh this is a hard one! I love shopping second hand and depop is full of gems but that's not going to be the answer to solving fast fashion and there are plenty of stores that sell new ethical clothes. I love Matt and Nat for bags (I have a backpack that has basically not left my back since I bought it). Birdsong has to be my favourite store for affordable ethical clothes, they give a percentage of their profits to women's charities which is just amazing; Xandra Jane are obviously a close second though!

thefairedit

I love People Tree and Gather & See, they have an amazing selection of ethical and independent brands. ASOS has a really cool Eco Edit where you can find trendy and affordable pieces!

india_pixie

I know there are so many incredible ethical fashion brands out there, from my experience (maybe I'm just not looking in the right places) they tend to be more high end than budget and I struggle to find pieces that are 'me' so for someone who's trying to shop 'on the cheap' and find individual pieces, charity shops are my favourite place to shop. You can find so many high end, vintage and high street pieces for half the price and none of the guilt. My favourite fashion find was a gorgeous Oasis dress which I found in a charity shop,  it cost me £6, the original price tag was still attached at £188. Bargain. 


M a n y   t h i n k   e t h i c a l / s u s t a i n a b l e   f a s h i o n   i s
u n f  a s h i o n a b l  e ,   w h a t   d o   y o u   t h i n k   o f   t h i s ?

cellvrdoor

It hurts me when people think second hand shopping is unfashionable, if you know where to look you can find some incredible items! Plus, shopping ethically only makes you more creative with your wardrobe, if you are into fashion then it will definitely test you but it will also force you to create looks you would never have thought of previously and I think those people would be pleasantly surprised.

tollydollyposh

It's another myth and it's something I'm trying to change people's minds on with my blog. I think because the very early days of this "fashion movement" involved handmade garments and a rather hippy aesthetic, that's still in their minds. We need to show that there are brands who value ethics just as much as style and that once again, second-hand shopping can be worth your while. 

besmacc

I understand why the stigma is attached - hemp fabrics and a lack of ethical haute couture makes it seem hippy/uncool. However, there are so many ethical brands creating stylish pieces, and bloggers are leading the way for showing these off. Here comes the Fashion Revolution!

justdeenie

I can understand where the stigma comes from, but funding an unethical and unsustainable industry is far uglier than any ethical piece I have seen to date. I think sustainable fashion calls for much more creativity and artistry - meaning you find beautiful clothing that will look great for longer than one season.

astoryfortmrw

I understand the presumption because ethical/sustainable fashion is much slower than fast fashion, but I don’t think that it makes ethical/sustainable fashion unfashionable. Moreover, I think that people who think ethical/sustainable fashion is unfashionable don’t do their research. I know many ethical/sustainable brands who create stylish and current (yet timeless) pieces.

eleanorclaudie

I think it's the opposite, you can really tailor ethical/sustainable fashion to suit you as a person and it allows your wardrobe to be more unique. Second hand shopping (especially depop) is a great way to tailor sustainable fashion to your personal style but a lot of fashion brands that are sustainable are really stylish for example reformation and People Tree. I think it's just the mindset and stereotype that people have of clothes that actually do have a positive difference to the environment.

thefairedit

That’s really not true at all! There are so many new brands with really cool designs out there, you just have to look for it.

india_pixie

This is so not true, all you have to do is look up some ethical blogger babes or have a look around a charity shop and your mind will soon be changed!!

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